parse_guess() returns the parser vector; guess_parser() returns the name of the parser. These functions use a number of heuristics to determine which type of vector is "best". Generally they try to err of the side of safety, as it's straightforward to override the parsing choice if needed.

parse_guess(x, na = c("", "NA"), locale = default_locale())

col_guess()

guess_parser(x, locale = default_locale())

Arguments

x

Character vector of values to parse.

na

Character vector of strings to use for missing values. Set this option to character() to indicate no missing values.

locale

The locale controls defaults that vary from place to place. The default locale is US-centric (like R), but you can use locale() to create your own locale that controls things like the default time zone, encoding, decimal mark, big mark, and day/month names.

See also

Other parsers: col_skip, parse_datetime, parse_factor, parse_logical, parse_number

Examples

# Logical vectors parse_guess(c("FALSE", "TRUE", "F", "T"))
#> [1] FALSE TRUE FALSE TRUE
# Integers and doubles parse_guess(c("1","2","3"))
#> [1] 1 2 3
parse_guess(c("1.6","2.6","3.4"))
#> [1] 1.6 2.6 3.4
# Numbers containing grouping mark guess_parser("1,234,566")
#> [1] "number"
parse_guess("1,234,566")
#> [1] 1234566
# ISO 8601 date times guess_parser(c("2010-10-10"))
#> [1] "date"
parse_guess(c("2010-10-10"))
#> [1] "2010-10-10"